What I Learned from Jacob Morgan about the Employee Experience

 In Comms Heroes

I caught up last week with Jacob Morgan, futurist and author of the just-published “Employee Experience Advantage.” It has a great subtitle: “How to win the war for talent by giving employees the workspaces they want, the tools they need and a culture they can celebrate”.

I have not yet read the book, but plan to crack it open this weekend. I am hoping it’s not like a lot of business books i.e. 250 pages because the publisher asked for 250 when in fact there are only 125 pages of good content. We like a lot of what Jacob writes, so we bought a bunch of copies for the office and for our customers. Jacob writes about the tools employees need–and we believe that our platform should be one of the new technologies that companies deploy to dramatically improve their employee experience.

My top takeaways from my conversation with Jacob:

  • the traditional process of running employee engagement surveys, fixing one driver of engagement with a new perk or benefit, and then waiting until next year is broken. It’s the equivalent of an adrenaline shot, and once it wears off, the employee experience is left unchanged and still flawed.
  • the employee experience should mean “how the organization works.”  And changing that for the better will drive the sustained engagement that leaders — and employees — crave. Jacob’s P.O.V. is that there are three primary components to how work gets done: culture, technology, and physical space.
  • companies need to address these three areas for two reasons: 1.) to attract and retain talent in a digital world and 2.) to perform better than their competitors and peer companies.
  • of the 250 companies that he researched, only six percent qualified for the “experiential” designation — and those companies way out-performed the others in terms of EPS. The R.O.I. proof is obvious and measurable.
  • when starting the journey to transform the real drivers of employee engagement (culture, physical space and technology) do the analysis of your own employees and start with your own data as to their needs and wants — don’t design it based on someone else’s playbook or prescription.
  • as you would expect, Jacob suggests it starts the top, and that a dedicated employee experience champion is needed (how many VPs of Employee Experience on Linkedin?), as well as a strong HR-IT partnership to deliver the technology component of the winning employee experience.

What I am most excited about is the Employee Experience Index that Jacob has launched.  If he tracks companies over time via the index, then we will have real data to measure the long-term impact of making these investments in our employee experience.

You can preview the first 30 pages of Morgan’s new book, The Employee Experience Advantage: How to Win the War for Talent by Giving Employees the Workspace they Want, the Tools they Need, and a Culture They can Celebrate, here. This book guides readers on a journey of creating a place where employees actually want to work based on analysis of over 250 leading organizations. To order your copy, follow this link. 

 

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